Family Worship Resources

Family Worship Resources

Family Worship is Necessary So, we’ve collected some excellent resources for you to help you not only make it a priority, but equip you to do it well! Don Whitney, author of the book Family Worship, recently developed a 5 day email course on how to lead your family in worship.  Please take advantage of this excellent, free resource called Family Worship 101. Here is what Crossway publishing has to say about it:  Join Donald S. Whitney for a free, 5-day email course designed to teach you how to lead your family in worship every day.  You’ll learn the 3 key components of family worship and practical tips designed to help you actually make it happen on a daily basis, taking the mystery out of leading your loved ones in worshiping God together. After the course is over, you’ll continue to receive encouraging, gospel-centered content delivered directly to your inbox once a week—helping you walk closely with God each and every day. Also, my friend, Jason Helopoulos, wrote a fantastic book on Family Worship entitled Neglected Grace: Family Worship Christian Home.  That book will convince you of the necessity of family worship, inspire you to do it, but also instruct you in the “how to” of it.  Both of the above mentioned books are well worth your time. But even if you don’t pick up either of them, please sign up and check out the FREE, 5 day Family Worship 101 email course! Lastly, remember to sign up for the Young Families Weekend! Registration begins February 1st at...
Give Thanks

Give Thanks

Sometimes blogs focusing on holidays get complicated and overthought.  Sometimes we try too hard to pull out a little nuance and miss the obvious.  Thanksgiving is this week, and the theme is simple: Give thanks.  The Puritans set aside a day to thank God for His provision in the harvest.  The title of the holiday has, in some ways, helped protect the simplicity of the day.  Thanksgiving is all about giving thanks.  Some people thank God, some don’t.  But most everyone gives thanks to someone for something. Thanksgiving Day is a great day to gather with family and friends and tell God how grateful we are for His provision.  While there are many things I am thankful for: family, friends, work, health, food, shelter, and clothing, to name a few; this year I truly am most thankful for God, His son Jesus, and the Holy Spirit.  They have done for us what we could never have done for ourselves.  The Godhead provided for our ultimate need… redemption.  The Father planned it, The Son accomplished it, and The Holy Spirit applied it to all children of God. Rather than elaborating, just let the words of Caedmon’s Call (one of the all-time great bands) song, Thankful, sink in: You know I ran across an old box of letters While I was bagging up some clothes for Goodwill But you know I had to laugh at the same old struggles That plagued me then are plaguing me still I know the road is long from the ground to glory But a boy can hope he’s getting some place But you see, I’m...
Anger

Anger

Anger strikes up all kind of images in our minds. Some of those images are painful.  Maybe because of what someone has done to us in anger, or maybe because of what we have done to others in anger.  Likely it’s a little of both. Anger is a confusing emotion.  Deep down inside we know it’s appropriate and yet we feel guilty when we experience it.  Today our goal is not to equip you in a blog but rather to point you to some resources we think can be of great value to you.  But before pointing you to those resources just a brief word about anger. Anger is not sin.  Anger is an emotion.  Anger can become sinful, but anger, in and of itself, is not sinful.  Anger without just cause is unnecessary.  Anger with just cause is actually necessary.  God gets angry.  God gets angry when sin is committed.  When His creation (people, places, things, etc.) is not valued and honored it is an assault on Him.  He gets ticked off at that.  It is called righteous anger.  God knows how to unleash His anger in an appropriate way.  Anger is not sin. Anger is an emotion. Anger can become sinful, but anger, in and of itself, is not sinful. Click To Tweet It is good and right for humans to experience anger over sin.  It is not good and right for humans to unleash anger in a way that is damaging, harmful, and dishonoring to God and His creation.  Here’s what we all need help with: appropriately directing anger in the right place, with the right...
The Purpose of Parenting, Part 3

The Purpose of Parenting, Part 3

Biblical hope is not at all like our modern day understanding of hope.  Psalm 78:5-7 says, “He commanded our fathers to teach to their children, that the next generation might know them, the children yet unborn, and arise and tell them to their children, so that they should set their hope in God and not forget the works of God, but keep his commandments.”  The purpose of parenting is godly offspring.  And godly offspring set their hope in God.  They do not set their hope in talent, connections, education, hard work, money, opportunity, or any other good thing like that.  All those things are good, but they are not worthy of being the object of hope. What is Hope?  Biblical hope is not at all like our modern day understanding of hope.  It is not wishful thinking.  It is not a desire which may or may not be met.  Biblical hope is confident expectation.  Biblical hope is knowing the God of truth, resting on his promises, and acting accordingly.  It involves an unseen but certain future (Romans 8:24-25).  The bible tells us we have: hope that God will comfort us in suffering and ultimately deliver us from affliction (2 Cor 1:7, 11); hope of eternal life (Titus 1:1-2); hope of a resurrection of all people (Acts 24:14-15); and hope of the return of Jesus (Titus 2:13) just to name a few.  Hope is given by the Holy Spirit (Romans 15:13) and received through the Word of God (Romans 15:4; Colossians 1:5).  Biblical hope - real hope - is knowing the God of truth, resting on his promises, and acting accordingly. Click To Tweet The Fruit of...
The Purpose of Parenting, Part Two

The Purpose of Parenting, Part Two

The purpose of parenting is godly offspring. Malachi 2:15 says, “And what was the one God seeking? Godly offspring.”  The purpose of parenting is godly offspring.  Godly offspring rather than good offspring is the goal.  In human terms, godly people are good, but not all good people are godly.  Godly means the person becomes more and more like God. Good kids are a delight.  They are moral, respectful, diligent, trustworthy, well-mannered and well-manicured. Many times they turn out successful.  In other words, they look really good on the surface.  When kids look and sound good on the surface, parents can sometimes sit back, breathe a sigh of relief, and get lulled into thinking the goal has been met.  The desire for good kids is a God-given desire.  It’s a right desire.  But good is not the goal…godly is.  Goodness is a practice, godliness is a state of being.  Goodness can be man-made, godliness is divinely developed.  Goodness can occur from discipline and conditioning, godliness only happens when the Holy Spirit takes ownership of a heart.  Goodness can take shape in a relatively short period of time, godliness takes time.  I’m not saying goodness is the opposite of godliness.  What I’m saying is that one is on the surface while the other runs deep.  As parents we can’t stay on the surface.  It’s easier but it doesn’t prepare offspring for a walk with God.  When my son’s surface looks great, I feel great.  And it could be that all is great, but Jesus had several harsh things to say about Pharisees who looked good on the surface without the heart being...